Mandy Baker Johnson

Living without Shadows

Tag: widow

Rahab’s Journal: See

I am praying hard for Boaz. He is off his food and seems preoccupied. The harvest is good this year and the farm is going well; I think the trouble is with his heart.

Naomi has been a good friend for many years and we knew her husband and the boys when they were little. It’s natural for us to discuss her and Ruth at our dinner table. It’s clear to me that Boaz admires Ruth. Indeed, how could he not? She left everything to come to Bethlehem as a refugee with her mother-in-law, and her faith in God shines out.

I’ve never heard Ruth complain about her lot or look discontent. For all she’s so young, she is a widow, and I’m sure her heart aches at times. Then there is the fact that she and Naomi are very poor. I try to help all I can without embarrassing them, and Boaz has instructed his farmhands to deliberately leave extra crops behind for Ruth to glean.

I suspect Boaz has fallen for Ruth and I’m glad of it. But will he make a move? I don’t know. He sees her beautiful character – everyone can – but I wonder whether he is afraid he’s too old for her? It’s true, he’s older than most bridegrooms. But he has kept himself for the right woman. In my heart of hearts, I’m certain Ruth is the one. If only Boaz would see it.

Refuge

Today’s Lenten word prompt is REFUGE.

One of my favourite authors as a child was Patricia St John. Actually, I still enjoy her books!

Her book Star of Light tells the story of Kinza, a little girl born blind who is sold to the village beggar by her cruel stepfather but who is rescued by her older brother and taken to a missionary nurse in the city. Kinza is adopted by the nurse and goes from poverty and abuse to a life of love and security. But after a few months, the stepfather discovers where she is and secretly whisks her back to the village where he can make money from her begging. In collaboration with Kinza’s brother, the nurse travels to the village to try and negotiate with Kinza’s stepfather who denies that he has the child.

There is a beautiful scene where Kinza, who has been hidden under rugs by her stepfather, hears the nurse calling her name and cries out. At once, the nurse scoops the little girl onto her lap and holds her safe. Kinza relaxes in the arms she trusts but then begins to tremble when her stepfather starts shouting. The nurse immediately reassures her and Kinza ceases to be afraid of this horrible man who mistreats her. She has a place of refuge, in the arms of her adopted mother.

 

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