Mandy Baker Johnson

Living without Shadows

Tag: refugee

Lydia’s Song

This novel on child sex trafficking in Cambodia is written in three parts. The first section focuses on Lydia, an English woman in the year 2036. She reminisces about her expat life thirty years previously: fostering a homeless child called Song and falling in love with Radha, a local man. It was a life of contentment until tragedy struck.

The second section is all about Song, the young Vietnamese refugee child in Cambodia who was fostered by Lydia. The two met when Song had run away from an unhappy home life. Lydia took her in and the pair settled into a comfortable life together. Then Radha came on the scene. He worked as a receptionist at the English doctor’s practice. Charming, pleasant, full of fun: life seemed perfect.

But then Song was trafficked into the child sex industry. Bought and sold. Lydia tried frantically to find her but it was impossible.

The third and final section brings both Lydia’s and Song’s stories together to a satisfying conclusion.

The book is well-researched and highlights the plight of many young children in this part of the world. Song’s story is particularly well-written and gives enough information without being brutal with gruesome details.

Personally, I didn’t warm to Lydia as a character but liked Song who, despite a rocky start and horrific experiences as a girl, turns out as a lovely, balanced woman.

I think this book would be a useful place to start for anyone wanting to learn more about child sex trafficking.

Instant Apostle provided me with a free Kindle copy for the purpose of writing an unbiased review.

Refugee Stories

This is seven real-life stories of people who became refugees and sought asylum in the UK. They are written in the individuals’ voices and edited by Dave Smith who brought the book together and adds facts at the end of each story.

I was struck by how normal – middle class even – these seven individuals are. Each one was educated, often very well off in their own country, but ended up having to flee their homes for various reasons. The first six stories are very similar though set in various countries. The seventh story is a little different.

It opens up the reality of the having to deal with the Home Office. After going through all sorts of major trauma in their own countries, often with their lives under threat, and difficult journeys to the UK, the last thing these people need is to deal with endless and – at times – seemingly badly organised bureaucracy.

This book brings the vagueness of thousands of refugees and asylum seekers down to the individual’s story I’m reading.

For anyone wanting to know what it’s really like to flee your country in fear of your life, this is a useful book.

It’s not easy reading. Partly because with the exception of one or two stories I could never forget I was reading and that made it hard work. I think this was because each chapter has a different ‘voice’ and so the writing doesn’t always flow easily.

Instant Apostle provided me with a free Kindle copy for the purpose of writing an unbiased review.

 

Rahab’s Journal: See

I am praying hard for Boaz. He is off his food and seems preoccupied. The harvest is good this year and the farm is going well; I think the trouble is with his heart.

Naomi has been a good friend for many years and we knew her husband and the boys when they were little. It’s natural for us to discuss her and Ruth at our dinner table. It’s clear to me that Boaz admires Ruth. Indeed, how could he not? She left everything to come to Bethlehem as a refugee with her mother-in-law, and her faith in God shines out.

I’ve never heard Ruth complain about her lot or look discontent. For all she’s so young, she is a widow, and I’m sure her heart aches at times. Then there is the fact that she and Naomi are very poor. I try to help all I can without embarrassing them, and Boaz has instructed his farmhands to deliberately leave extra crops behind for Ruth to glean.

I suspect Boaz has fallen for Ruth and I’m glad of it. But will he make a move? I don’t know. He sees her beautiful character – everyone can – but I wonder whether he is afraid he’s too old for her? It’s true, he’s older than most bridegrooms. But he has kept himself for the right woman. In my heart of hearts, I’m certain Ruth is the one. If only Boaz would see it.

Remember

There are things that God remembers and things that He chooses to forget.

God remembers individuals. The Bible includes lists of names that make up family trees and the ancient nation of Israel. I love that all kinds of people make up Jesus’ family tree – children conceived in incest, affairs and adultery, prostitutes, asylum seekers and refugees. We might be inclined to look down on such people, but God wasn’t ashamed to include them in His Son’s family tree.

In Hebrews 11, various heroes of faith are named for commendation.

When Jesus was a man on earth, He promised that God remembers when we offer even a glass of water in His name so that He can one day give us a reward.

God values individuals. He knit us together in the womb and has good plans for our lives. If Jesus was still a man on earth, you would be the kind of person He would sit and have a coffee or a beer with. He loves you more than can ever know.

But God also chooses to forget: the Bible says that when we’re truly sorry for wrong things we think, say and do, God promises not to remember those sins against us. This is only possible because Jesus took the penalty for all of our sin so that we wouldn’t have to.

I love this God who remembers my name and chooses to forget my sin.

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