Mandy Baker Johnson

Living without Shadows

Category: Book Reviews (page 1 of 6)

Good Christian books I can recommend

The Search for Home

The Search for Home is the true story of Beatrice Smith who was ten-years-old when the troubles between the Hutus and Tutsis broke out in Rwanda in the 1990s. She witnessed horrific events and saw scenes no human being should ever have to see.

From Rwanda, her family fled (literally) across the border into Zaire, then onward to Kenya, before enduring a lonely year in Swaziland. They spent four years as refugees, often homeless and hungry, trying to learn new languages and cultures, desperate to stay together against the odds.

At last Beatrice’s father sought asylum in the UK and, after much prayer and many problems along the way, the rest of the family were able to join him.

The family’s faith and prayer life shines out of this book. Their commitment to praying when all hope seemed lost challenges my prayer-life, and I had to remind myself that Beatrice and her siblings were children. But they also saw God answering their prayers in amazing and unexpected ways.

This book is so timely for today. It’s easy to get desensitised to seeing weary men, women and children walking along dusty roads clutching bundles and blankets or even seeing them crowded into flimsy dinghies trying to cross the Mediterranean.

Beatrice’s story makes refugees human again. I can’t imagine what it would be like to lose my home and be forced to flee England because of war. Beatrice makes it a little more real. When you lose everything and are simply trying to survive day to day, how easy it is to wander too far when collecting wood for fire and find yourself in danger. Or when you are desperate and have no options, you become a sitting target for human traffickers.

This book helps the reader to comprehend some of the suffering refugees endure. Even something as basic as having a working kitchen, a shower with running water and a toilet, and then being forced to do without. Not knowing where your next drink of water will come from, never mind anything else. And this on top of all the emotional and mental trauma.

When reading the final chapters, I held my breath as Beatrice shared her hopes for life in the UK. She longed to feel welcome, to be accepted, to feel safe and secure, to know she was home. Would she find that? Having read her story, I really wanted her hopes to be realised.

The Search for Home is a page-turner. It’s very readable. And as I wrote earlier, a timely message for today. It’s not enough to look at people from other cultures and say from the comfort of having known nothing but safety and security that they should be doing this or that. I just want to play my part in making them feel welcome without judging them. In their shoes, what would I do?

Instant Apostle provided me with a free Kindle copy for the purpose of writing an unbiased review.

Trying to Fly

I loved this new book by Annie Try. The first chapter reminded me of a cross between Emma Donoghue’s The Room and John Grisham’s A Time to Kill. A chilling event is seen through the eyes of six-year-old Jenny Drake, whose life is forever changed by what she witnessed and experienced.

From chapter two onwards, we follow fifty-six-year-old Jenny as she works with her psychologist to try and find healing and wholeness by facing her past. The tragedy she witnessed as a child left her with all sorts of problems, probably the most significant being agoraphobia. An important part of Jenny becoming free is to return to the beach where the event took place.

At the beach, Jenny meets Jim, who witnessed the same event as an eleven-year-old boy.

Jim becomes a solid friend for Jenny and he persuades her to join him in a spot of sleuthing to get to the bottom of the mystery. The police had closed the case but there are many loose ends. Together, they begin to search for the truth and to clear the reputation of a good man.

I loved this book and couldn’t put it down. As well as the mystery-factor, my eyes were also opened to the hidden issues people around me may have. As I followed Jenny’s progress in battling the fears that sometimes threatened to overwhelm her, it helped me to see that people act oddly for a reason. She evoked my sympathy, though at times I got frustrated: You’ve come so far, don’t give up now! I also wanted to scream at her not to be so trusting (no spoilers!).

Annie Try is a psychologist as well as an author and she really knows her stuff. Her expertise when revealing Jenny’s mental and emotional struggles shone through, and made this book all the more special.

It’s a gripping read and I heartily recommend it.

Instant Apostle provided me with a free Kindle copy for the purpose of writing a review, but I will also be purchasing a paperback copy that I can lend to friends.

90 Days in John 14-17, Romans, James

I’m excited about this devotional book by Tim Keller and Sam Allberry.

Each short chapter gives the Bible text for the day followed by a few helpful notes. The notes are split up by sub headings, as well as questions which aid the reader to think about the passage and how it applies to your life. At the end of the chapter is a small paragraph with suggestions of how to pray in to what you have just read.

The page layout (it’s on my Kindle) is easy on the eye with lots of white space and clear headings and short paragraphs. It is appealing and draws you in, making you want to read it.

This is precisely the kind of devotional I like to start my day with. I don’t have to work at trying to wake up reading lots of dense text, and at the end of a chapter wonder what I’ve just read because I haven’t taken any of it in. With a book like 90 Days In, I can begin reading and find that my brain and heart are engaging with the subject matter almost at once.

I love Tim Keller’s books. His love and passion for God shine brightly through each page, and he brings fascinating insights from the original Hebrew and Greek.

I’ve read only one other book by Sam Allberry but found him to be a very readable writer with a deep love for God. He comes across as compassionate and sensitive with a wholesome love for the truth.

I’m looking forward to reading and savouring 90 Days In, using it as my morning devotional. I have given it **** on Amazon and am grateful to Cross Focused Reviews for providing me with a free copy to review.

 

 

Forty Years A Gambler

If you’ve ever wondered what life with a gambling addiction looks like, wonder no more. In this easy-to-read book, Ian shares his incredible story of how what started as a seemingly harmless and fun pursuit turned into life-changing addiction, debt, crime and prison. Gambling was ruining his life and stealing his happiness and peace of mind.

But Ian’s life was turned completely around when he encountered Jesus. It’s thrilling to read how he has been set free from a gambling addiction and is helping others in similar circumstances.

Ian’s wife also shares her story of a downward spiral into significant debt through playing Bingo.

Playing Bingo and fruit machines may appear to be harmless, yet can lead to heartache, misery and financial debt.

This book throws light on some of the inner workings of the gambling industry….. An eye opener, though perhaps not that surprising.

In the last part of Forty Years A Gambler, there are helpful appendices from various organisations working with people with gambling problems, as well as the results of a gambling impact survey set up by Ian and endorsed by Birmingham University.

For anyone working with vulnerable people who may be suffering from this secret and little understood addiction, this book is a must-read.

 

A Bird, A Girl, and A Rescue

This book has so much that would appeal to eight to twelve year old readers. Set in the fictional African country of Rwendigo, the main character is young Kiisa who is off to boarding school for the first time. Her father leaves her with a special gift which becomes more important to Kiisa as the story goes on. Her growing relationship and dependence on her father’s gift is akin to knowing God and growing in faith.

This book is a mix of African legend with Christian undertones and modern-day guerrilla warfare. I couldn’t help but be reminded of the school girls kidnapped by Boko Haram. Yet even though touching on serious issues, the book remains light, focusing on friendship, loyalty, courage and standing up to bullies. Kiisa loves playing football and makes a great goalie.

Young readers will enjoy the fun and adventure aspects of the story. Older readers – and adults – will hopefully gain a little insight into the tension of living in a politically-corrupt area with the ever-present danger of guerrilla warfare.

I enjoyed reading A Bird, A Girl and A Rescue by J A Myhre. I have given it **** on Amazon and am grateful to Cross Focused Reviews for providing me with a free copy to review.

 

 

Gospel Transformation Bible

Do you like bargains?

Some people are fab bargain hunters, I’m not normally one of them. But today I am.

10ofThose are doing a one-off promotion of the new ESV Gospel Transformation Bible. The usual retail price is £50 or £60, but 10ofThose are selling them for £7 and £9. Wow. It’s first come, first served, so I’d advise you to get in there quick!

There are lots of great study Bibles on the market, but this one is unique in that it traces each Bible passage back to Christ. A number of Bible scholars have contributed to this product and the study notes are full of both scholarly insight and pastoral wisdom.

I enjoy using different versions of the Bible in my personal studies and readings because I can get slightly different insights, so I’m looking forward to getting my own copy of this ESV Gospel Transformation Bible.

The cover designs are also appealing to me: there is a choice of attractive leather-look and genuine leather covers in different colours, as well as in Tru-Tone. What’s not to like?

It’s also worth thinking about the fact that Christmas is only 104 sleeps away, and these would make great presents…. 😀

Here’s what Jonathan Carswell at 10ofThose and Adrian Reynolds of the Proclamation Trust have to say about this fantastic product:

Heaven, How I Got Here

Heaven How I Got HereThis is the story of the thief on the cross by Colin S Smith. It is a short book based on part of Luke’s account of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. The book opens at 6 am on the day the thief was to be executed by crucifixion. Each short chapter is based on a period of time – one gripping chapter is about a single minute – during Good Friday.

The author imagines the thief’s background and childhood, explores how the condemned man might have felt on execution day, and his changing reaction to Jesus. As the thief’s eyes were opened and realisation dawned as to who Jesus really was, the reader can follow his thought process. Colin S Smith explains the gospel simply and clearly, cleverly woven as the thief’s own thoughts.

I enjoyed reading this book. I find well-researched fiction based on an event or person from the Bible brings the account to life, particularly if it stays true to the culture of the time. Heaven, How I Got Here did that for me.

It would be a blessing to any follower of Jesus this Easter, but it would also make a perfect read for someone exploring what Easter is all about.

I have given this book **** on Amazon and am grateful to Cross Focused Reviews for providing me with a free copy to review.

 

1 Samuel For You

I thoroughly enjoyed reading 1 Samuel For You by Tim Chester. The only downside was that because I was under time constraints to join this blog tour, I was unable to ponder the thought-provoking and heart-searching questions at the end of each section. So I’ll have to go back and do that!

There are thirteen chapters and each one is divided into two sections, and both sections contain three or four questions for reflection. I liked the way the chapters are clearly set out with appropriate headings and sub headings, allowing the reader natural pauses to digest what has just been read. Another thing I appreciated was the fact that words that may be unfamiliar to some readers were linked to a glossary (I was using my Kindle). Tim Chester is clearly a writer who puts the ‘cookies on the bottom shelf’, ensuring the information being shared can be understood by all readers.

The book opens with the story of Hannah’s distress over her barrenness, the subsequent answering of her prayers in the form of baby Samuel and her outpouring of praise to God who brings down the proud and lifts up the humble. This theme of pride and humility is woven through the rest of the book as it follows the lives of the different characters:  Samuel, Eli, the rise and doom of King Saul, and the rise of King David. The author highlights Saul as being like the first Adam who fell and David as being a type of Christ who is the second Adam.

Saul is not the promised second Adam. He is the old Adam revisited…. David will be God’s choice. And from his dynasty will come the new Adam, the snake-crusher.

The author also offers pastoral insights and little golden nuggets of wisdom through the book. These are a few that I particularly valued:

…excuses do not bring true freedom and forgiveness. Freedom and forgiveness come through honest repentance.

David encourages us to remember how God has delivered us in our personal histories, and ultimately through the cross and resurrection.

Envy is the mother of malice and gives birth to murder.

If we glory in God, then we do not need to manoeuvre for prestige, nor will we envy the success of others. If we find identity in Christ, then how we compare with others or what they think will not matter.

I wholeheartedly recommend this book. It is very readable, and it would be possible to simply enjoy reading through and gaining an oversight of 1 Samuel, or to use as part of your own devotional time, or in a study group. It truly blessed me and I’m looking forward to reading it again more slowly, as part of my regular devotions.

My grateful thanks to Cross Focused Reviews and The Good Book Company for providing me with a free copy for the purpose of writing a review.

 

Christ Or Hitler?

Christ or Hitler

Christ or Hitler? is a collection of stories – in loose chronological order – about the life of Wilhelm Busch, who was an evangelist and pastor during the Nazi regime in Germany. It has been compiled and translated by Christian Puritz.

The book opens fairly dramatically with Busch’s house burning down during an air raid at the same time as him having an altercation with the secret police, which is a good hook to draw the reader in. We are then introduced to his parents, for whom he evidently had great respect and who, in his eyes, could do no wrong. Busch seemed to have a happy childhood and a fulfilling ministry. No matter what situation he found himself in, he took the opportunity to share His love and passion for Christ.

Busch’s ministry was filled with adventures, since he rubbed shoulders with all kinds of people, but he handled the different situations in which he found himself with a great deal of boldness, humility and grace. His encounters with the gestapo and imprisonments are not the main thrust of the book; it is more about what everyday life looked like during the time Hitler rose to power and ruled Germany.

I thought the translation was excellent, although it does not paint quite such a clear picture as if written and read in the mother tongue. It would provide some insights into life in Nazi Germany for anyone with an interest in this area.

I am grateful to Cross Focused Reviews and EP Books for providing me with a free ecopy of this book for the purpose of writing a review.

Eternity Changes Everything

Eternity Changes Everything

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Stephen Witmer‘s book Eternity Changes Everything. He has a pleasant, chatty, easy-to-read writing style and his passion for his subject shines through on every page. For me, it ranks right up there as one of the best Christian books I have read on eternity in terms of getting me excited about where I am headed and how that changes life now.

A theme  that links together the later chapters is that of a tightrope walker: ‘The central point of this book is that Christians are meant to live, and can live, in a healthy, exhilarating, joyful, productive, frustrating, painful, challenging tension between restlessness and patience.’ The author uses a graphic of a tightrope walker balancing between ‘contentment’ (because of where we are headed) and ‘dissatisfaction’ (because we’re not there yet) and in each future chapter, he adds to this picture. I was impressed that the graphic worked perfectly on my Kindle and was well-aligned with the text.

Pastor Stephen draws out wonderful insights from the Scriptures in this book, and links Old Testament types with New Testament truths beautifully. He is clearly a gifted teacher with a deep love and respect for the Scriptures and for the Lord.

This book doesn’t just raise our expectations in seeing the new heaven and earth as a certain reality to look forward to, it also challenges as to how that truth impacts our lives in the here and now. This is not a book full of theory, but one of practicality – our lives are meant to be impacted. Pastor Stephen does not take for granted that all of his readers will be believers, and he creates opportunity for his readers who don’t know Jesus to put their faith in Him. For believers, he encourages us that because we are citizens of heaven and our identity is in Christ, our lives are changed and we experience ‘restlessness with patience’ as we anticipate our future. The result of this is that as we learn to need the world less, we end up loving the world more.

It’s a miracle whenever unlovely things and unlovely people are loved with heavenly love. As citizens of heaven extend the love of the new creation into the here and now, this world sees a better world to come.

Eternity changes everything is a book I am already recommending to my friends as a resource that will encourage, inspire and teach. I loved its contemporary style and that it is jam-packed full of biblical truth. I’m very grateful to Cross Focused Reviews and The Good Book Company for supplying me with a free e-copy of this book for the purpose of writing a review.

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